Hall of Fame

Pitchers Wing

Hitters Wing

Ken Bayer Latest BLB HOF Inductee: Good relievers can often go unappreciated and unnoticed. That was not the case today when Ken Bayer was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame. He will go down in history as one of the more dominant relievers of his generation. Bayer was 40, when he retired from baseball.

Speaking at his induction, one of his managers observed, “A guy who throws what he intends to throw, that’s the definition of a good pitcher. That’s why Ken was such a great pitcher.”

In an illustrious career Bayer nailed down 583 saves, appeared in 1302 games, fashioned a 95-88 won-loss record with a 2.25 ERA, and had 1526 strikeouts in 1390.1 innings.


Black Joins Greats in BLB Hall of Fame: The Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame has added a new immortal to its roster. The great bullpen specialist J.J. Black was inducted today as baseball’s newest legend.

“I’m humbled to be here,” Black said. “This is hallowed ground. My whole career has been storybook. I’ve kept running into the right people at the right time. I’ve often said that I was like a kid on a carnival ride at the amusement park, and I didn’t get off — I just stayed on it my whole baseball career. To my hundreds of teammates through the years…thanks for sharing the ride with me. It was amazing.”

Black also thanked his dad and older brother for believing in him, when he didn’t believe in himself. His dad always told him he was going to be big baseball star one day. Black would always reply, “Aww, c’mon, Dad, that’s never going to happen.” Throwing in the backyard, his older brother would always goad him, “You’re throwin’ like a sissy.” He would then put everything he had, and more, into the next pitch.

Well, that sissy did pretty well. Over his career Black appeared in 897 games, recorded 426 saves, fanned 1072 batters in 979.1 innings, and compiled an impressive 1.73 ERA with a 85-51 won-lost mark. He didn’t just become a baseball star, he became a Hall of Famer.


Campoveroe Now Hall of Famer: The way Cesaro Campoveroe played baseball made the word “superstar” seem inadequate. He played the game at an even higher level and that’s why he is now one of the immortals in the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

Campoveroe played in 2087 games with a .281 lifetime batting average. Among his 2012 hits were 389 doubles, 33 triples and 318 home runs. He also scored 1264 runs and drove in 1218 runs. Campoveroe was 39, when he retired.

One of his teammates described the talented left fielder this way: “The greatness of Cesaro Campoveroe was something that had to be seen… and to see him was to remember him forever.”

Cesaro Campoveroe was inducted into the Hall of Fame today after being elected by the Baseball Writers Association.

The new Hall of Famer told the audience, “I just went out and did my job every day… and I guess I must have done it pretty well. Thank you for the honor you have given me today.”


Carbajal Enters BLB Hall of Fame: How do you get to the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame?
Just hit 500 homers, get 3000 hits, win 300 games or perhaps just save 300 games. Not an easy task, is it? But occasionally it does happen — it happened to the gifted third baseman Héctor Carbajal, who recently retired at the age of 38.

Héctor Carbajal was recently inducted into the coveted shrine of hardball heroes by the Baseball Writers Association. Carbajal was always a favorite of the beat writers — always quick with a quip and always willing to talk about the game — but that’s not why he got elected to the Hall of Fame. Carbajal played a pretty good brand of baseball, too. He played in 2339 games, had 2488 hits, 387 home runs, 1427 RBIs and scored 1326 runs while batting .275 in his career.

Reminiscing about his life in baseball, Carbajal said it all began by hitting grand slam homers in the last of the ninth in his backyard and ended up in the Hall of Fame. “It was quite a trip. I can’t believe they pay us money to play a kid’s game. Thank goodness, I was good at it. I only got a high school education and I had to cheat to get that. Who knows what I would have done without baseball? I was just a poor old country boy. For the longest time I even thought the last words of the national anthem were ‘play ball.'”


Hall of Fame Welcomes Chamissa: What a career and what a ballplayer.
Carmem Chamissa truly was one of the best to play the game and today he was enshrined into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

“It is an honor to be mentioned with the greatest players of all time. I want to thank my family, friends and teammates for supporting me throughtout this long career,” the outstanding first baseman said at the induction ceremony.

In his career, Chamissa played in 1676 games with a .284 lifetime batting average. Among his 1729 hits were 360 doubles, 38 triples and 355 home runs. He also scored 1060 runs and drove in 1204 runs.

Carmem Chamissa retired from baseball at the age of 37.


Durham Takes Place Among Greats: On a bright, windy afternoon, Chuck Durham, the superb second baseman, stood outside the doors to the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame. He collected his thoughts and tried to contain his emotions before entering the shrine to baseball’s greatest players.

Durham later disclosed some of his thoughts to reporters at the press conference.
“To be numbered among these great players,” he said, “some of them my idols growing up… that’s almost too much to fit my mind around.”

Nevertheless, this outstanding performer stepped through those doors to claim his place among baseball’s immortals. His induction into the Hall of Fame, which took place yesterday, surprised nobody.

Chuck Durham was 36 when he retired from baseball. In 2020 career games he compiled a .300 batting average with 2245 hits, 139 home runs, 889 RBIs and 1161 runs scored.


Haynes Joins HOF Immortals: “He simply produced — game after game after game. That’s what I loved about him.”

Those sentiments were expressed by one of Von Haynes’s managers at the gifted catcher’s Hall of Fame induction ceremony yesterday. On a cloudy, but comfortable afternoon, he took his rightful place among the best Brewers League Baseball players of all-time.

The newest Hall of Famer assessed his career in these words: “I did my best to contribute to the team — in the field, at the plate, in the dugout. I didn’t care about personal numbers. I just went out there to win.”

Haynes played in 2158 games with a .299 career batting average and 2383 hits. He also scored 1210 runs and drove in 1236 runs with 243 home runs.

Haynes retired from baseball, when he was 40.


Kubota Honored by BLB Hall of Fame: Enshrinement beckoned for Kyoden Kubota, as he was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today. Kubota, who played many of his 2414 games at catcher, was an outstanding hitter and batted .289 over his career and swatted 252 home runs. Baseball’s newest legend collected 1329 RBIs and scored 1520 runs during his illustrious career.

But while he was class act on the field, it was off the field where Kyoden Kubota shined the most. He quietly integrated himself in his team’s community, selflessly donating his time and money to various causes. The press was largely unaware of his charity and Kubota never made a fuss about it.

“I played a child’s game for many years and this game brought me fame and fortune,” Kubota explained during his ceremony. “For some people, it’s enough, but my mother raised me to realize that money doesn’t make a person great. Being good at a game doesn’t make a person great. Helping those in need and giving of yourself selflessly is what makes a person great. And that’s what I have tried to be my entire life: great, both on the field and off of the field.”


Morgan Gets Call From Hall: In a ceremony witnessed by all the living members of the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame, Rex Morgan stepped on the stage to join the game’s immortals. He retired at the age of 39 and during his 2317-game career batted .295, produced 412 home runs, 2538 hits and 1453 RBIs, while scoring 1368 times. The legendary first baseman, surrounded by his joyful family, looked on as his plaque went up on the wall of fame at baseball’s shrine to its greatest players.

After the induction ceremony, one of the Hall of Famers notorious for doctoring the ball was asked how did he pitch to Morgan. “Greaseball, greaseball, greaseball, that’s all I threw him… and he still hit them. He’s the only player in baseball who consistently hit my grease. He saw the ball so well, I guess he could pick out the dry side.”


Geoff Scott Enters Hall Of Fame: One of the best players ever, second baseman Geoff Scott, has received the ultimate honor for a baseball player — being inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

The induction ceremony, which was held today, included tributes from his former teammates. One of them recognized his unparalleled work ethic, another his “naturally pure” swing, and yet another, his love for the game.

Scott received numerous awards during his playing days, but he said, nothing can compare to being enshrined into the Hall of Fame.

In a career spanning 2084 games, Scott batted .271 with 1909 hits, 251 home runs, 1105 RBIs and 1145 runs scored.

He was 37, when he retired.

Trujillo Honored by BLB Hall of Fame: The baseball legends today welcomed to their exclusive club a new shortstop by the name of Dani Trujillo. His induction ceremony was held today at the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

“I remember thinking to myself after I had had a couple of good years, that if I keep doing this, maybe I just might make it to the Hall of Fame. The dream became a reality today and I must say this is a very proud day today.

Over his career Trujillo batted .290 and collected 3512 hits, 224 home runs and 1261 RBIs. He played in 3003 games and retired from baseball at age 46.

His former manager introduced Trujillo saying, “The big thing about Dani is that he could hit any pitch. I don’t mean only strikes. He could hit a ball off his ankles or off his ear.”


Dimmick Joins HOF Immortals: During his fantastic pitching career Pat Dimmick was hard-nosed competitor. Prior to an important game, he once told reporters, “If we lose today, it will be over my dead body. They’ll have to leave me face down on the mound.”

It was this attitude that helped to inspire Dimmick to such an outstanding career. Today he was rewarded with his admission into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

Dimmick retired from baseball at age 47 and fashioned a 182-108 won-lost record in his career with a 2.74 ERA. The gifted hurler appeared in 448 games, fanned 2164 hitters and piled up 2650.1 innings pitched.

One of his managers at the induction ceremony observed, “Pat was a bulldog on the mound. If a man put a gun to my head and said I’m going to pull the trigger, if you lose this game, I’d want him to pitch that game.”


Al Hamilton Makes BLB Hall Of Fame: The Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame honors those players who are the best at their position, those special individuals whose skills make them unforgettable in the eyes of baseball fans everywhere. Another such player was recognized today, as right fielder Al Hamilton was enshrined at his induction ceremony.

There was no mistaking the look of pride on Al Hamilton’s face as he saw his statue for the first time and the plaque recounting the many accomplishments over his 2069-game career. Hamilton played until he was 44 and had a lifetime .306 batting average with 299 home runs. Baseball’s newest Hall of Famer batted in 1141 runs and scored 1391 times.

Fans of all ages watched in appreciation as Hamilton blinked back tears. “I really don’t know what to say during such an enormous moment,” he managed to finally say, “because words cannot describe all the feelings and thoughts running through my head. The love and appreciation from all my fellow players and all the fans out there has been overwhelming, but I would not be here today without the love and support of my family. My greatest thanks goes to them.”


Gaston Joins Greats in BLB Hall of Fame: Zak Gaston played baseball a long time and he played it well. Then at the age of 44, he called it a career. In recognition of his outstanding accomplishments, Gaston has been voted into the Hall of Fame.

“There is so much to love about this game,” the newest honoree said during his induction speech at the Brewers League Baseball Baseball Hall of Fame. “I couldn’t imagine anything greater than my first major league game. Then I hit my first home run. Then the other landmarks came. But nothing tops today… to think that I made it to the Hall of Fame.”

The legendary left fielder put up some impressive numbers. Gaston played in 2721 games, compiled a .302 batting average, hit 166 home runs, drove in 1161 runs and scored 1550 times during his career.


Joe Aurillo Joins the Hall of Fame: What a way to cap a glorious career — get elected to the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame. That’s exactly what happened to pitching star, Joe Aurillo. The Baseball Writers Association rewarded him for his sensational seasons on the mound and today he took his place among the baseball immortals.

Aurillo told the audience at the ceremonies, “Baseball has been my life … and what a wonderful life it has been. The truth is I would have played it for almost nothing — but I wouldn’t have told any of the owners that.”

Aurillo had a career record of 175 victories and 101 losses with 2125 strikeouts in 2511.1 innings and a 3.10 ERA. He was 55 when he retired from baseball, and he appeared in 400 games.


Rojas in Brewers League Baseball HOF: Today the Brewers League Baseball Baseball Hall of Fame opened its hallowed doors to its newest member, first baseman Joe Rojas. One of the most feared hitters ever to grace the batter’s box, Rojas terrorized pitchers for quite a few seasons, collecting 2368 hits over the course of his career, including 413 home runs, while compiling a .271 batting average.

But while Rojas gave opposing pitchers nightmares, he was not without nightmares of his own. His hard-partying youth led to addiction and other personal problems. “I did not like myself, and I tried to use alcohol as a means to run away from my problems,” Rojas said. “It amazes me now that I was still able to play ball at a high level during that time.”

Rojas blinked back tears as he continued his speech. “I was lucky to have a such a loving family, both blood-related and baseball. They supported me through my low points and gave me the strength to put my life back together. And look what it got me: a beautiful wife and kids, and now an induction into the Hall of Fame.”

Curtis Gets Call From Hall: The Brewers League Baseball made it official today. They honored one of the best pitchers to ever step on the mound. In recognition of a superlative career, R.J. Curtis today joined the other legends in the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

He was introduced by his favorite manager, who said, “To be a successful manager you have to have two things: faith in God above … and several pitchers like R.J. Curtis on the mound.”

Baseball’s newest legend comes with great credentials. He entered the Hall with a 185-118 record, a 3.36 ERA, and 2558 strikeouts in 2636.2 innings. He retired from baseball at age 37.


Fujii Now Hall of Famer: Kokoro Fujii, a standout left fielder throughout his Brewers League Baseball career, has been inducted into the Hall of Fame.

During the induction ceremony, he credited the coaches, who taught him to play the game and the teammates, who taught him to be a professional.

However, the most important influence, Fujii said, was his father.

“My father never gave up on me,” he said, “no matter how often I felt like giving up on myself. When I left Japan to come to the BLB it was the hardest decision of my life, but in the end I felt I made the right decision. I love him and miss him, and dad this is for you.”

In his 1930-game career, Fujii hit .280 with 1927 hits, 369 home runs, 1316 runs scored and 1150 RBIs.

He wrapped up his career at the age of 34 and retired, hanging up his cleats in 2012.

Morris Among Greats in BLB HOF: Johnathan Morris played baseball a long time and he played it well. Then at the age of 40, he called it a career. In recognition of his outstanding accomplishments, Morris has been voted into the Hall of Fame, with 80% of ballots voting him in.

“There is so much to love about this game,” the newest honoree said during his induction speech at the Brewers League Baseball Baseball Hall of Fame. “I couldn’t imagine anything greater than my first major league game. Then I hit my first home run. Then the other landmarks came. But nothing tops today… to think that I made it to the Hall of Fame.”

The legendary left fielder put up some impressive numbers. Morris played in 2279 games, compiled a .300 batting average, hit 186 home runs, drove in 1094 runs and scored 1284 times during his career.


Brewers League Baseball Honors Gutiérrez: The Baseball Writers Association has put the crowning touch on Raulo Gutiérrez’s outstanding baseball career. They put the great mound superstar in the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today.

He modestly gave credit to “better than average pitching skills and lots of three-run homers” for making it possible for him to move up into the legendary class of baseball players — but the sportswriters, his teammates and peers knew differently.

In reality Gutiérrez was a craftsman, an artist. He was a perfectionist. He painted a ballgame stroke by stroke and when he got through pitching a game, it was a masterpiece.

By the time he retired at age 40, Gutiérrez fashioned an impressive record of 202-121, had an ERA of 3.30, struck out 2625 batters and held opposing teams to a .229 batting average. Gutiérrez made 454 mound appearances and worked 3028 innings in his career.

The ‘Magician’ Enters the Hall: For quite a few seasons Joe Ponte unnerved batters as one of the best pitchers around. Yesterday it was his day for the jitters. The talented twirler became a baseball immortal as he was enshrined into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

“This is overwhelming, over the top. I can’t put into words what this means,” Ponte told the crowd that had gathered to honor him as baseball’s newest legend. “You don’t get to the Hall of Fame by yourself. I got here with the help of some great teammates, coaches and managers. One of the greatest lessons I learned was how to pitch from a hitter’s perspective. That’s when I became a better-than-average big league pitcher.”

Joe Ponte retired in 1991 at age 35 after a celebrated baseball career. He pitched in 454 games, and compiled an impressive 179-132 won-lost record with a 3.02 ERA.

Herberholz joins the BLB Hall: Today was a historic day that Jamie Herberholz will never forget. The superb pitcher was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame alongside the great baseball immortals of the past.

He was introduced by one of his former managers, who said, “He was the best I have seen in my lifetime. Jamie was a fabulous pitcher. The key to his success was that he threw the ball as far from the bat and as close to the plate as possible.”

The talented pitcher retired from baseball at age 40, but not before he amassed 206 victories and one Brewmasters cup. In his illustrious career, Jamie Herberholz was 206-145 with a 3.14 ERA. He made 504 mound appearances and struck out an all time record of 3466 in 3146 innings.

Hall of Fame Inducts Shortstop: Today the Brewers League Baseball Baseball Hall of Fame opened its hallowed doors to its newest member, shortstop Tex Watts. A great hitter, Watts terrorized pitchers for quite a few seasons, collecting 2280 hits over the course of his career, including 194 home runs, while compiling a .249 batting average. As good as his hitting was though his fielding is what set him apart as he collected 5 DWI’s and made 7 All-Star appearances.

But while Watts gave opposing pitchers nightmares, he was not without nightmares of his own. His hard-partying youth led to addiction and other personal problems. “I did not like myself, and I tried to use alcohol as a means to run away from my problems,” Watts said. “It amazes me now that I was still able to play ball at a high level during that time.”

Watts blinked back tears as he continued his speech. “I was lucky to have a such a loving family, both blood-related and baseball. They supported me through my low points and gave me the strength to put my life back together. And look what it got me: a beautiful wife and kids, and now an induction into the Hall of Fame.”


Nakashima Gets Call From Hall: Another pitcher was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today, but this time, it wasn’t a starting pitcher. Instead, Koichi Nakashima proved that relievers were worth such a distinction for a career that spanned 1290 appearances. His dominating presence led to 607 saves and a 2.27 ERA, while he struck out 1496 in his 1392.2 innings. During his career Nakashima also chalked up a 87-87 record.

“A lot of people think that relievers aren’t important enough to be considered Hall of Fame material,” the bullpen ace said during his speech. “But my teammates knew differently. All the starters loved having me come in after one of their good performances because they knew they’d get a win that day. I’m just glad that there are other people that agree with them.”

Koichi Nakashima ended his career at the age of 42.

Mejia Enshrined in HOF: At the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies today, the longtime friend and manager of Edgar Mejia told the audience, “The worst thing as a manager is the day you realize you want to win more than the players do. I never had that problem with Edgar. Nobody wanted to win more than this gifted pitcher.”

For his strong and consistent pitching over the years, Mejia was voted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association.

When he ended his career at age 38, Mejia had a career won-loss record of 200 wins and 95 losses with 3019 strikeouts in 2663.1 innings and a 2.64 ERA.


Antonio Cardenas Makes BLB Hall Of Fame: Antonio Cardenas, a standout third baseman throughout his Brewers League Baseball career, has been inducted into the Hall of Fame in his first attempt.

During the induction ceremony, he credited the coaches, who taught him to play the game and the teammates, who taught him to be a professional.

However, the most important influence, Cardenas said, was his father.
“Pops never gave up on me,” he said, “no matter how often I felt like giving up on myself.

In his 2402-game career, Cardenas hit .261 with 2316 hits, 377 home runs, 1274 runs scored and 1478 RBIs.

He wrapped up his career at the age of 40 and retired, hanging up his cleats in 2015.

Marshburn Joins Greats on First Attempt: A huge crowd watched Sonny Marshburn become the newest member of the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today.

“I’m a big believer in whatever you want, if you want something out of this game, you’ve got to put the work in it. You’ve got to work hard,” said the outstanding right fielder, whose new plaque described him as “an artisan with a bat whose daily pursuit of excellence produced a .263 lifetime batting average, 2214 hits and 397 home runs.”

After the induction ceremony Marshburn was asked what was the most thrilling moment in his career. He responded quickly, “No doubt about it, your first hit in the big leagues. That’s tops. It means you’re on your way. When you get the first hit, then you can get the rest.”

Jones Enters BLB Hall of Fame: All-time he played in 1818 games, batted .257 with 316 home runs, 1697 base hits, 1014 RBIs and 1063 runs scored — stats great enough to be acclaimed a baseball immortal.

Jimmy Jones was officially inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today.

At his Hall of Fame induction, the superstar left fielder told the audience the secret of his success: “I was born to be a ballplayer… I also practiced a lot. Sunup to sundown in the summertime my brothers and I would be on the ballfield. We did it every minute we could. Boy, I loved to play baseball. Still do, and still would, if I could. I always got a special kick on opening day, no matter how many you went through. I looked forward to it like a birthday party when you’re a kid. You think something wonderful is going to happen.”

One of his managers summed up his career very well: “You saw him standing out there on the diamond and you knew you had a pretty darn good chance to win the baseball game.”

Jones retired from baseball in 2016, when he was 38. He wore a Indianapolis Racers hat at his induction ceremony.

Jamie Thomas Inducted into Hall Of Fame: At the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies today, the longtime friend and manager of Jamie Thomas told the audience, “The worst thing as a manager is the day you realize you want to win more than the players do. I never had that problem with Jamie. Nobody wanted to win more than this gifted pitcher.”

For his strong and consistent pitching over the years, Thomas was voted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association.

When he ended his career at age 37, Thomas had a career won-loss record of 175 wins and 89 losses with 2142 strikeouts in 2344.1 innings and a 3.27 ERA.

Feliciano Joins Greats: Hector Feliciano, the great first baseman and consummate professional, was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today.

At the induction ceremony, he grew misty-eyed as he recalled the highlights of his playing career: his first base hit, his first home run and — humorously — the first time he was thrown out at home plate.

Feliciano says he blew through his third base coach’s stop sign. As he returned to the dugout, his manager simply glared at him.

“His eyes just burned a hole right through me,” Feliciano chuckled. “If looks could kill, I wouldn’t be here today.”

More often than not, Feliciano pleased his managers and coaches during a superb career.

His all-time numbers show he compiled a .283 batting average and collected 2478 hits, 491 home runs and 1384 RBIs. In all, he played in 2332 games.


Brummett Takes Place Among Greats: There is a new statue in the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame. It belongs Gil Brummett.

The star pitcher was inducted this past weekend. All it took to get there was 175 wins.

“I always dreamed of being a Brewers League Baseball player, but I never dreamed of being in the Hall of Fame,” Brummett said, “I could have never envisioned myself standing next to my childhood idols and yet here I am. And to the Hall of Famers sitting behind me, I am truly humbled and in in awe of standing here in front of you.”

In his career, 2007 Pale Ale Pitcher Award winner Gil Brummett posted a record of 175-112 and fanned 1890 batters in 2520 innings with a 2.86 ERA.

At times Gil Brummett fought back tears as he thanked his family and close friends for sticking by him when he had to overcome some difficult personal problems.

Summing up his years on the diamond, Brummett offered a hopeful message to the large induction crowd.

“I care for this game with my heart and soul. I dedicated my life to being the best pitcher I could be. You leave me humbled and grateful for this honor. I’d like to leave an offering of a message of hope. That is, with the grace of God, you can change your life, whoever you are.”


Davenport Brawlers Star Shortstop Nelson enters Hall of Fame: On a bright, windy afternoon, Dave Nelson, the superb shortstop, stood outside the doors to the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame. He collected his thoughts and tried to contain his emotions before entering the shrine to baseball’s greatest players.

Nelson later disclosed some of his thoughts to reporters at the press conference.
“To be numbered among these great players,” he said, “some of them my idols growing up… that’s almost too much to fit my mind around.”

Nevertheless, this outstanding performer stepped through those doors to claim his place among baseball’s immortals. His induction into the Hall of Fame, which took place yesterday, surprised nobody. He collected votes from 0.0% of the writers.

Dave Nelson was 38 when he retired from baseball. In 2457 career games he compiled a .261 batting average with 2400 hits, 282 home runs, 1151 RBIs and 1256 runs scored.

Abraham Santana Makes BLB Hall Of Fame: Abraham Santana, a standout catcher throughout his Brewers League Baseball career, has been inducted into the Hall of Fame in his 0th attempt.

During the induction ceremony, he credited the coaches, who taught him to play the game and the teammates, who taught him to be a professional.

However, the most important influence, Santana said, was his father.
“Pops never gave up on me,” he said, “no matter how often I felt like giving up on myself.

In his 2052-game career, Santana hit .252 with 1699 hits, 304 home runs, 1029 runs scored and 1008 RBIs.


J.J. Caplan Enters Hall Of Fame: During his tenure in the Brewers League Baseball J.J. Caplan was nothing but class, on the field and off the field. Now he is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024, having been elected by 0.0% of eligible voters.

Lifetime Caplan hit for a .291 average and totaled 2300 hits, 350 home runs and 1229 RBIs.

The fine right fielder was officially inducted today and took his place among baseball’s best.

One of his friends and former teammates told the audience, “The greatest thing he taught me was on my first day in the big leagues — it was the hustle. He hit two one-hoppers to the pitcher and ran as hard as he could to first base. J.J. set a great example for me to model my career. His hustle and desire — those were the little things that stood out for me. Plus he’s one of the best hitters I’ve ever played with.”

In his speech Caplan expressed his thanks and gratitude to the many people who helped make this wonderful day possible.
“I have been truly blessed. I have been able to do something I love and get paid very well for it. There was no place that I ever wanted to be, but on the baseball diamond every day doing what I love.”


Manning Joins Greats in BLB Hall of Fame: R.J. Manning joined Brewers League Baseball’s Hall of Fame today. The overpowering reliever relied on 496 career saves and a lifetime ERA of 2.04 to secure his induction.

“Relievers are an important part of the game,” Manning said in his induction speech. “We might only get a couple, three outs a game, but they’re usually when the game is on the line.”

In his career Manning registered a 77-57 mark and struck out 1759 in 1286.2 innings while appearing in 1127 games.


Fernando Hernandez Inducted into Hall Of Fame: The newest member of the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame looked impressive standing in front of the assembled crowd. The bronze plaque shined in the bright sun, gleaming from the fresh polish. “Man, that guy is handsome!” Fernando Hernandez commented. “I never realized that I looked so good!”

One of the most colorful characters in league history, Hernandez was also one of the league’s most dominant starting pitchers. Racking up a career record of 286-196, he was a pitcher that no manager ever worried about while he was on the mound. Off the field, however…

“We always had to be careful in the locker room,” one of his former managers remembered with a laugh. “If you weren’t paying attention, you would fall victim to one of his infamous pranks. There was never a dull moment when this guy was around.”

“I always felt that if I could bring the guys together by making them laugh, then I was doing my job on the days I wasn’t pitching,” Hernandez explained. “We play a kids’ game after all, so why shouldn’t we have some fun? In fact, it was probably the key to my success. I just hope the other statues in the Hall are prepared; I’m sure this guy will keep them on their toes.”

In his outstanding career Hernandez appeared in 670 games, pitched 4196 innings, fanned 3095 batters, walked 1243 and compiled a 3.28 ERA.


Jimenez Latest HOF Legend: Brewers League Baseball’s most exclusive club has a new member — reliever Reynaldo Jimenez is now in the Hall of Fame. The famed bullpen specialist earned his induction with 762 saves, 1396 game appearances and a 2.06 ERA in his brilliant career. Jimenez also compiled a 97-84 record and struck out 2030 batters in 1520.2 innings.

It is a rarity for a reliever to be inducted. The voters seem to favor starting pitchers over relief specialists, but not this year.

Jimenez expressed his opinion in his induction speech. “We can’t compete with their statistics, their innings and their strikeouts. It’s like comparing a shortstop’s numbers against a first baseman or an outfielder. We’re just playing a different position. But I think without relievers, it’s tough to win.”


Yahn Among Greats in BLB HOF: Today Pat Yahn attained the highest honor a player can get in the Brewers League Baseball — he was admitted to its Hall of Fame.

His exploits on the mound are legendary. Year after year Yahn was one of the league’s elite pitchers with 210 total wins. Baseball greats of the past and present were in attendance at this year’s ceremony. Friend and foe alike had nothing but good things to say about this year’s honoree.

A manager who Yahn played for described his pitching success this way: “Pat always had good stuff and good location. His ball would start out looking like a baseball and when it got to the plate — it looked like a marble.”

When he retired from baseball with a career 210-113 won-lost mark, Yahn had pitched in 452 games, fanned 3027 batters, tossed 3102.1 innings and posted an impressive 2.80 ERA.


Todd Taylor Latest BLB HOF Inductee: There is a new statue in the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

It belongs Todd Taylor. The star pitcher was inducted this past weekend. All it took to get there was 244 wins.

“I always dreamed of being a Brewers League Baseball player, but I never dreamed of being in the Hall of Fame,” Taylor said, “I could have never envisioned myself standing next to my childhood idols and yet here I am. And to the Hall of Famers sitting behind me, I am truly humbled and in awe of standing here in front of you.”

In his career, former first round draft pick Todd Taylor posted a record of 244-143 and fanned 2950 batters in 3380.1 innings with a 2.92 ERA.

At times Todd Taylor fought back tears as he thanked his family and close friends for sticking by him when he had to overcome some difficult personal problems.

Summing up his years on the diamond, Taylor offered a hopeful message to the large induction crowd.

“I care for this game with my heart and soul. I dedicated my life to being the best pitcher I could be. You leave me humbled and grateful for this honor. I’d like to leave an offering of a message of hope. That is, with the grace of God, you can change your life, whoever you are.”


Legends Welcome Lippert to HOF: The hallowed halls of baseball have been enlarged. Today a great pitcher was added to its list of legends as perennial all-star Dave Lippert was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

He was famous for his quirky motion. Lippert baffled hitters with a rocking, twisting windup and an assortment of release points that ranged from over the top to nearly underhand. Many batters said, “He threw everything at me but the ball.”

Lippert posted a lifetime 202-134 record with a 3.22 ERA and whiffed 2783 batters in 2814 innings.


Los Angeles Dinos Star Shortstop Lona enters Hall of Fame: The baseball legends today welcomed to their exclusive club a new shortstop by the name of Marco Lona. His induction ceremony was held today at the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

“I remember thinking to myself after I had had a couple of good years that if I keep doing this, maybe I just might make it to the Hall of Fame. The dream became a reality today and I must say this is a very proud day.

Over his career Lona batted .286 and collected 2959 hits, 323 home runs and 1386 RBIs. He played in 2732 games. His best years came as a member of the Los Angeles Dinos, whose hat he wore at his induction ceremony.

His former manager introduced Lona saying, “The big thing about Marco is that he could hit any pitch. I don’t mean only strikes. He could hit a ball off his ankles or off his ear.”


Lowe Gets Call From Hall: 360 home runs, 2082 hits and 1151 RBIs are the stuff of legend, but J.R. Lowe doesn’t see it that way.

“For me, baseball is about the team winning. I could have taken an 0-for-4 that day, but if our team won, I don’t think you could have come into the locker room and been able to tell that I did not get a hit because the most important thing to me was that we won. That was what we intended to do when we took the field. That’s what it was about.”

Fortunately for baseball’s newest immortal, he had far more good days than bad days. That’s why Lowe has been installed into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association. In his historic career the standout center fielder participated in 2152 games, batted .254, scored 1160 runs… and won a few games, too.


Zack Reeves Latest BLB HOF Inductee: Zack Reeves has just become immortal — the star pitcher has just been selected to the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

What a fabulous career he has had. Reeves’s career record shows a 202-143 won-lost mark and an ERA of 2.89. In 749 game appearances he fanned 2424 batters in 3152 innings and held opposing hitters to a .242 average.

His name will now added to the list of legends this weekend at the induction ceremonies at the Hall of Fame.

One of his former manager commented on what it was like to hit against the new Hall of Famer. “When you think it’s a ball, it’s a strike. When you swing at what you think is a strike, it’s in the dirt. He was a remarkable pitcher.

Reeves was well-known for winning ballgames and for pitching inside. “Show me a guy who can’t pitch inside and I’ll show you a loser.” Writers once asked him on Mother’s Day if he would brush back his mother. He curtly replied, “Only if she was diggin’ in.”


Dunn Now Hall of Famer: During his tenure in the Brewers League Baseball T.J. Dunn was nothing but class, on the field and off the field. Now he is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2028.

Lifetime, Dunn hit for a .282 average and totaled 2768 hits, 548 home runs and 1604 RBIs.

The fine first baseman was officially inducted today and took his place among baseball’s best.

One of his friends and former teammates told the audience, “The greatest thing he taught me was on my first day in the big leagues — it was the hustle. He hit two one-hoppers to the pitcher and ran as hard as he could to first base. T.J. set a great example for me to model my career. His hustle and desire — those were the little things that stood out for me. Plus he’s one of the best hitters I’ve ever played with.”

In his speech Dunn expressed his thanks and gratitude to the many people who helped make this wonderful day possible. “I have been truly blessed. I have been able to do something I love and get paid very well for it. There was no place that I ever wanted to be but on the baseball diamond every day doing what I love.”


Bafford Joins Greats in BLB Hall of Fame: “He simply produced — game after game after game. That’s what I loved about him.”

Those sentiments were expressed by one of Ethan Bafford’s managers from his Pittsburgh Millers days at the gifted left fielder’s Hall of Fame induction ceremony yesterday. On a cloudy, but comfortable afternoon, he took his rightful place among the best Brewers League Baseball players of all-time.

The newest Hall of Famer assessed his career in these words: “I did my best to contribute to the team — in the field, at the plate, in the dugout. I didn’t care about personal numbers. I just went out there to win.”

Bafford spent his best years playing for the Pittsburgh Millers, playing in 1749 games with a .288 career batting average and 1911 hits. He also scored 1106 runs and drove in 1189 runs with 410 home runs.


Steve Suarez Makes BLB Hall Of Fame: Steve Suarez, the great right fielder and consummate professional, was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today.

At the induction ceremony, he grew misty-eyed as he recalled the highlights of his playing career: his first base hit, his first home run and — humorously — the first time he was thrown out at home plate.

Suarez says he blew through his third base coach’s stop sign. As he returned to the dugout, his manager simply glared at him.

“His eyes just burned a hole right through me,” Suarez chuckled. “If looks could kill, I wouldn’t be here today.”

More often than not, Suarez pleased his managers and coaches during a superb career.

His all-time numbers show Suarez compiled a .286 batting average and collected 3546 hits, 411 home runs and 1562 RBIs. In all, he played in 3077 games.


Murillo Enters BLB Hall of Fame: On a bright, windy afternoon, Ricky Murillo, the superb left fielder, stood outside the doors to the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame. He collected his thoughts and tried to contain his emotions before entering the shrine to baseball’s greatest players.

Murillo later disclosed some of his thoughts to reporters at the press conference. “To be numbered among these great players,” he said, “some of them my idols growing up… that’s almost too much to fit my mind around.”

Nevertheless, this outstanding performer stepped through those doors to claim his place among baseball’s immortals. His induction into the Hall of Fame, which took place yesterday, surprised nobody.

In 2185 career games he compiled a .292 batting average with 2262 hits, 441 home runs, 1328 RBIs and 1318 runs scored.


Hall of Fame Honors Pat Evans: The journey took a while, but he finally arrived — one of baseball’s finest hurlers, Pat Evans, is now a member of the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

Commenting on his election, one of his longtime managers said, “My idea of managing is giving the ball to Pat Evans and sitting down and watching him work. He certainly made my job easier. And he certainly made me a better manager.”

And pitch he certainly did — Evans appeared in 526 games in his career, tossed 3264.1 innings with 2738 strikeouts and compiled an impressive 235-127 record and 2.67 ERA.

One of his opposing managers had this to say about Evans, “Pat was one of the greatest pitchers I ever saw. He had knowledge, movement and form. It was wonderful to watch him pitch when he wasn’t pitching against you. It was poetry in motion.”

The newest member of the Hall of Fame will be inducted at ceremonies this weekend.


Davila Gets Call From Hall: Ray Davila, a standout catcher throughout his Brewers League Baseball career, has been inducted into the Hall of Fame in his 0th attempt.

During the induction ceremony, he credited the coaches who taught him to play the game and the teammates who taught him to be a professional.

However, the most important influence, Davila said, was his father. “Pops never gave up on me,” he said, “no matter how often I felt like giving up on myself.

In his 2496-game career, Davila hit .292 with 2614 hits, 496 home runs, 1403 runs scored and 1479 RBIs.


Jamie McPherson Enters Hall Of Fame: One of the best players ever, center fielder Jamie McPherson, has received the ultimate honor for a baseball player — being inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

The induction ceremony, which was held today, included tributes from his former teammates. One of them recognized his unparalleled work ethic, another his “naturally pure” swing, and yet another, his love for the game.

McPherson received numerous awards during his playing days, but he said nothing can compare to being enshrined into the Hall of Fame.

In a career spanning 2778 games, McPherson batted .312 with 3206 hits, 408 home runs, 1547 RBIs and 1751 runs scored.


Talley Enters BLB Hall of Fame: Johnny Talley has just become immortal — the star pitcher has just been selected to the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

What a fabulous career he has had. Talley’s career record shows a 173-120 won-lost mark and an ERA of 3.05. In 432 game appearances he fanned 2965 batters in 2659.1 innings and held opposing hitters to a .220 average.

His name will now added to the list of legends this weekend at the induction ceremonies at the Hall of Fame.

One of his former manager commented on what it was like to hit against the new Hall of Famer. “When you think it’s a ball, it’s a strike. When you swing at what you think is a strike, it’s in the dirt. He was a remarkable pitcher.

Talley was well-known for winning ballgames and for pitching inside. “Show me a guy who can’t pitch inside and I’ll show you a loser.” Writers once asked him on Mother’s Day if he would brush back his mother. He curtly replied, “Only if she was diggin’ in.”


Hall of Fame Honors Adrian Pulido: The journey took a while, but he finally arrived — one of baseball’s finest hurlers, Adrian Pulido, is now a member of the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

Commenting on his election, one of his longtime managers said, “My idea of managing is giving the ball to Adrian Pulido and sitting down and watching him work. He certainly made my job easier. And he certainly made me a better manager.”

And pitch he certainly did — Pulido appeared in 521 games in his career, tossed 3471.2 innings with 2424 strikeouts and compiled an impressive 236-158 record and 3.08 ERA.

One of his opposing managers had this to say about Pulido, “Adrian was one of the greatest pitchers I ever saw. He had knowledge, movement and form. It was wonderful to watch him pitch when he wasn’t pitching against you. It was poetry in motion.”


Wilkinson Gets Call From Hall: C.J. Wilkinson, a standout shortstop throughout his Brewers League Baseball career, has been inducted into the Hall of Fame.

During the induction ceremony, he credited the coaches who taught him to play the game and the teammates who taught him to be a professional.

However, the most important influence, Wilkinson said, was his father. “Pops never gave up on me,” he said, “no matter how often I felt like giving up on myself.

In his 2829-game career, Wilkinson hit .282 with 3110 hits, 21 home runs, 1477 runs scored and 834 RBIs.



Jamie Urmson Enters Hall Of Fame: One of the best players ever, center fielder Jamie Urmson, has received the ultimate honor for a baseball player — being inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

The induction ceremony, which was held today, included tributes from his former teammates. One of them recognized his unparalleled work ethic, another his “naturally pure” swing, and yet another, his love for the game.

Urmson received numerous awards during his playing days, but he said nothing can compare to being enshrined into the Hall of Fame.

In a career spanning 2357 games, Urmson batted .260 with 2223 hits, 405 home runs, 1145 RBIs and 1334 runs scored.


Jared Kirby Enters Hall Of Fame: How do you get to the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame?

Just hit 500 homers, get 3000 hits, win 300 games or perhaps just save 300 games. Not an easy task, is it? But occasionally it does happen — it happened to the gifted catcher Jared Kirby, who retired at the age of 39.

Jared Kirby was recently inducted into the coveted shrine of hardball heroes by the Baseball Writers Association. Kirby was always a favorite of the beat writers — always quick with a quip and always willing to talk about the game — but that’s not why he got elected to the Hall of Fame. Kirby played a good brand of baseball, too. He played in 2654 games, had 2659 hits, 383 home runs, 1578 RBIs and scored 1452 runs while batting .276 in his career.

Reminiscing about his life in baseball, Kirby said it all began by hitting grand slam homers in the last of the ninth in his backyard and ended up in the Hall of Fame. “It was quite a trip. I can’t believe they pay us money to play a kid’s game. Thank goodness I was good at it. I only got a high school education and I had to cheat to get that. Who knows what I would have done without baseball. I was just a poor old country boy. For the longest time I even thought the last words of the national anthem were ‘play ball’.”


González Enshrined in HOF: “From the first time I saw him play, I knew he had the potential to be one of the best,” Héctor González’s first manager said, “and the more I saw him play, the more certain I was that he would reach that potential.”

He was just one of the people there at González’s enshrinement in the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame. It was a celebration of the career of one of the shining stars of his generation. His former teammates loved him and opposing fans loved to hate him, but respect followed him everywhere, as evidenced by the large crowd at the ceremony. Not only were many of his former Pawtucket Patriots friends there, but opposing players and managers as well, along with a large throng of fans.

The man of the moment was overcome with emotion when he finally took his turn at the podium to speak. “This is one of the greatest moments of my life and to share it with all of you here is… simply amazing. I would just like to thank my family and all my teammates for their support during my journey here. Individual honor was never my goal, winning was, but this is more than I could have ever dreamed.”

González retired with a .254 career batting average. He mainly played catcher, participated in 2200 games, hit 295 home runs and batted in 1171 runs.


Fred Frederick Joins the Hall of Fame: All-time he played in 1397 games, batted .301 with 348 home runs, 1528 base hits, 910 RBIs and 772 runs scored — stats great enough to be acclaimed a baseball immortal.

Fred Frederick was officially inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today.

At his Hall of Fame induction, the superstar first baseman told the audience the secret of his success: “I was born to be a ballplayer… I also practiced a lot. Sunup to sundown in the summertime my brothers and I would be on the ballfield. We did it every minute we could. Boy, I loved to play baseball. Still do, and still would, if I could. I always got a special kick on opening day, no matter how many you went through. I looked forward to it like a birthday party when you’re a kid. You think something wonderful is going to happen.”

One of his managers summed up his career very well: “You saw him standing out there on the diamond and you knew you had a darn good chance to win the baseball game.”

Frederick retired from baseball in 2029, when he was 34. He wore a Batavia Muckdogs hat at his induction ceremony.


Fajardo Joins Greats: Today was an historic day in the life of pitching star Willie Fajardo. Today he was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame and joined the ranks of baseball’s elite.

Lifetime, Fajardo put up a won-loss record of 166-107, had an ERA of 3.09, struck out 2725 batters and held opposing teams to a .218 batting average. Fajardo made 383 mound appearances and worked 2372 innings in his career.

During his induction speech, the talented hurler told the audience what he thought made him successful. “Less than a foot makes the difference between being the winning pitcher and the losing pitcher — a hero and a bum — and it can also be the difference between a short stint in the league, a ten-year career and making the Hall of Fame. Fortunately I was blessed with a strong arm, good movement and good location. Those few inches made a huge difference in my baseball career.”


Douglas Enters BLB Hall of Fame: The Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame honors those players who are the best at their position, those special individuals whose skills make them unforgettable in the eyes of baseball fans everywhere. Another such player was recognized today, as second baseman Jimmy Douglas was enshrined at his induction ceremony.

There was no mistaking the look of pride on Jimmy Douglas’s face as he saw his statue for the first time and the plaque recounting the many accomplishments over his 2468-game career. Douglas had a lifetime .318 batting average with 49 home runs. Baseball’s newest Hall of Famer batted in 896 runs and scored 1379 times.

Fans of all ages watched in appreciation as Douglas blinked back tears. “I really don’t know what to say during such an enormous moment,” he managed to finally say, “because words cannot describe all the feelings and thoughts running through my head. The love and appreciation from all my fellow players and all the fans out there has been overwhelming, but I would not be here today without the love and support of my family. My greatest thanks goes to them.”


Hall of Fame Welcomes Rodriguez: The Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame has added a new immortal to its roster. The great bullpen specialist David Rodriguez was inducted today as baseball’s newest legend.

“I’m humbled to be here,” Rodriguez said. “This is hallowed ground. My whole career has been storybook. I’ve kept running into the right people at the right time. I’ve often said that I was like a kid on a carnival ride at the amusement park, and I didn’t get off — I just stayed on it my whole baseball career. To my hundreds of teammates through the years…thanks for sharing the ride with me. It was amazing.”

Rodriguez also thanked his dad and older brother for believing in him when he didn’t believe in himself. His dad always told him he was going to be big baseball star one day. Rodriguez would always reply, “Aww, c’mon, Dad, that’s never going to happen.” Throwing in the backyard, his older brother would always goad him, “You’re throwin’ like a sissy.” He would then put everything he had, and more, into the next pitch.

Well, that sissy did pretty well. Over his career Rodriguez appeared in 1547 games, recorded 622 saves, fanned 1899 batters in 1622.2 innings, and compiled an impressive 2.76 ERA with a 82-110 won-lost mark. He didn’t just become a baseball star, he became a Hall of Famer.


Legends Welcome Kidwell to HOF: The baseball legends today welcomed to their exclusive club a new second baseman by the name of Jimmy Kidwell. His induction ceremony was held today at the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

“I remember thinking to myself after I had had a couple of good years that if I keep doing this, maybe I just might make it to the Hall of Fame. The dream became a reality today and I must say this is a very proud day.

Over his career Kidwell batted .273 and collected 2089 hits, 300 home runs and 1063 RBIs in 2056 games. His best years came as a member of the Philadelphia Freedom, whose hat he wore at his induction ceremony.

His former manager introduced Kidwell saying, “The big thing about Jimmy is that he could hit any pitch. I don’t mean only strikes. He could hit a ball off his ankles or off his ear.”


Hall of Fame Honors Geoff Yonke: Geoff Yonke’s dream finally came true today, as the talented and gifted shortstop was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

“I really don’t know what to say,” he said to the large crowd attending his ceremony. “It’s such an incredible honor. I always dreamed that this day would come, but now that it’s finally here … Someone pinch me, so I know I’m not dreaming!”

Over the course of his 2256-game career, Yonke was a .305 hitter with 2589 hits, including 248 home runs. He drove in 1073 runs and scored 1358 times as well. Yonke retired at the age of 37. He will join the Hall of Fame wearing a Washington Bats cap.


Piekarski Joins HOF Immortals: “He simply produced — game after game after game. That’s what I loved about him.”

Those sentiments were expressed by one of Dave Piekarski’s managers from his Pawtucket Patriots days at the gifted catcher’s Hall of Fame induction ceremony yesterday. On a cloudy, but comfortable afternoon, he took his rightful place among the best Brewers League Baseball players of all-time.

The newest Hall of Famer assessed his career in these words: “I did my best to contribute to the team — in the field, at the plate, in the dugout. I didn’t care about personal numbers. I just went out there to win.”

Piekarski spent his best years playing for the Pawtucket Patriots, playing in 1922 games with a .300 career batting average and 2208 hits. He also scored 1045 runs and drove in 1154 runs with 320 home runs.


McDade Installed in Hall of Fame: At the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies today, the longtime friend and manager of Johnny McDade told the audience, “The worst thing as a manager is the day you realize you want to win more than the players do. I never had that problem with Johnny. Nobody wanted to win more than this gifted pitcher.”

For his strong and consistent pitching over the years, McDade was voted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association.

When he ended his career McDade had a career won-loss record of 264 wins and 141 losses with 3570 strikeouts in 3606.1 innings and a 3.02 ERA.

Hall of Fame Inducts Engstrom: At the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies today, the longtime friend and manager of D.J. Engstrom told the audience, “The worst thing as a manager is the day you realize you want to win more than the players do. I never had that problem with “Brick”. Nobody wanted to win more than this gifted pitcher.”

For his strong and consistent pitching over the years, Engstrom was voted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame by the Baseball Writers Association unanimously.

When he ended his career, Engstrom had a career won-loss record of 208 wins and 136 losses with 3597 strikeouts in 3189 innings and a 3.18 ERA. He was a five time Pale Ale winner and was selected to the All-Star game eight times.

Legends Welcome Oto to HOF: Katsunori Oto, a standout center fielder throughout his Brewers League Baseball career, has been inducted into the Hall of Fame.

During the induction ceremony, he credited the coaches who taught him to play the game and the teammates who taught him to be a professional.

However, the most important influence, Oto said, was his father. “He never gave up on me,” he said, “no matter how often I felt like giving up on myself.

In his 2128-game career, Oto hit .270 with 2169 hits, 300 home runs, 1144 runs scored and 1145 RBIs. He was named to the All-Star team six times.

He wrapped up his career at the age of 38 and retired, hanging up his cleats in 2019.

K9 Installed in Hall of Fame: During his fantastic pitching career Pat Cinelli was hard-nosed competitor. Prior to an important game, he once told reporters, “If we lose today, it will be over my dead body. They’ll have to leave me face down on the mound.”

It was this attitude that helped to inspire Cinelli to such an outstanding career. Today he was rewarded with his admission into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame.

Cinelli retired from baseball at age 39 and fashioned a 160-116 won-lost record in his career with a 3.03 ERA. The gifted hurler appeared in 425 games, fanned 2485 hitters and piled up 2717.1 innings pitched. He also won two Brewmasters Cup championships with the Dallas Sharks in 2017 and 2020.

Delarruz in Brewers League Baseball HOF: Thousands of fans braved the wind to watch and cheer as baseball’s latest legend, Joe Delarruz, was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today. With his 161 home runs, 2248 hits and lifetime .264 batting average, everyone knew the gifted shortstop belonged with the immortals of the game. Still, Delarruz remained humble.

“I’m a very lucky person to be born with the skill to play baseball and through baseball I built a name for myself,” said Delarruz. Now his career as a baseball player is complete. “This seals it,” he said. “To get the recognition that every ballplayer seeks — this is completion for me.”

Delarruz retired at 39 in 1994. He was inducted as a member of the Wilmington Wildcats. In his epic career he played in 2285 games and finished with 883 RBIs and 1335 runs scored.

Hartford Whalers Legend joins Hall of Fame: What does it take to make the baseball Hall of Fame?

Well, whatever it is, Anselmo Mapalo has it. He was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame today.

Retiring at age 38, Mapalo had an illustrious career with a 192-147 won-loss mark and a 3.37 ERA. He racked up 440 mound appearances and struck out 2208 in 2947 innings.

Asked by reporters to describe what it takes to become a Hall of Famer, he replied, “I guess it all started at my high school graduation. The speaker said to be successful in life, you needed to find ‘something you love.’ I am here today because I found something I love. Baseball has been my life. It has never been a job. I have been able to have fun playing a game and making a wonderful life for myself and my family. I am a kid that never really had to grow up. Just go to the ballpark each day and throw strikes. That’s it.”

Anselmo Mapalo closed by saying, “God gave me the talent and blessed me with great coaches, managers, and teammates, who helped me develop it.”

Rosaro Enters BLB Hall of Fame: Good relievers can often go unappreciated and unnoticed. That was not the case today when Marco Rosaro was inducted into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame. He will go down in history as one of the more dominant relievers of his generation.

Speaking at his induction, one of his managers observed, “A guy who throws what he intends to throw, that’s the definition of a good pitcher. That’s why Marco was such a great pitcher.”

In an illustrious career Rosaro nailed down 376 saves, appeared in 731 games, fashioned a 62-52 won-loss record with a 2.23 ERA, and had 1179 strikeouts in 916 innings.

Ingram Gets Call From Hall: Dave Ingram played baseball a long time and he played it well. In recognition of his outstanding accomplishments, Ingram has been voted into the Hall of Fame.

“There is so much to love about this game,” the newest honoree said during his induction speech at the Brewers League Baseball Baseball Hall of Fame. “I couldn’t imagine anything greater than my first major league game. Then I hit my first home run. Then the other landmarks came. But nothing tops today… to think that I made it to the Hall of Fame.”

The legendary left fielder put up some impressive numbers. Ingram played in 2300 games, compiled a .290 batting average, hit 476 home runs, drove in 1435 runs and scored 1377 times during his career.

Hall of Fame Welcomes Lovera: It was announced today by Brewers League Baseball officials that renowned bullpen ace Diego Lovera has been inducted into the league’s Hall of Fame. The ceremony was held yesterday and attended by many of the current Hall of Fame members.

In his famed career Lovera registered 583 saves in 1131 game appearances, ending up with a 87-72 won-loss record and a 2.08 ERA. He chalked up 1630 strikeouts in 1191.1 innings, while limiting other teams to a .182 batting average.

Lovera described his feelings during his induction speech, commenting, “When you’re playing, awards don’t seem like much. Then, you get older and all of it becomes more precious. It is nice to be remembered.”

His longtime manager also spoke at the ceremony, stating, “As a pitcher he had it all… poise, confidence, control, great movement… and Diego wasn’t afraid to pitch inside. He lit up the room when he came in. He was a joy to be around. Diego loved playing baseball.”

Dave Koehler Inducted into Hall Of Fame: At his Hall of Fame induction legendary pitcher, Dave Koehler reminisced about his baseball career: “My how time flies. It is only a mere moment from your first spring training game to your first oldtimer’s game. But it a magnificent journey.”

Today Koehler was installed into the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame after his selection by the Baseball Writers Association.

Baseball’s newest HOF inductee was one fine hurler. When Koehler retired he had registered 184 wins and 100 losses, struck out 2659 hitters, pitched in 420 games and compiled a 3.15 ERA.

Among the many people he mentioned in his induction speech was his first manager. “He gave me my first opportunity when he could have kept other people. I was lucky — he was a Dave Koehler fan. You can’t get in the Hall of Fame without your first chance.”

Teel Joins HOF Legends: Someone once said, “There’s no crying in baseball.” But the tears were flowing in abundance today at the Hall of Fame induction of baseball great Dave Teel. They were tears of joy.

The superstar hurler got quite emotional at times during his speech as he retraced his journey from humble beginnings to the pinnacle of success in the baseball world.

He told the audience, “The greatest feeling in the world is to win a major league game. The second greatest feeling is to lose a major league game. For someone who truly loved playing baseball, I couldn’t really lose either way. Just to be on a baseball diamond is a wonderful feeling. Life just doesn’t get any better than that. I will really miss it.”

Baseball newest legend ended his career with 259 wins and 154 defeats and compiled a 3.07 ERA. Teel made 600 appearances and struck out 3507 in 3904.2 innings. Teams hit a composite .237 against him.

California Kodiaks Legend joins Hall of Fame: How do you get to the Brewers League Baseball Hall of Fame?

Just hit 500 homers, get 3000 hits, win 300 games or perhaps just save 300 games. Not an easy task, is it? But occasionally it does happen — it happened to the gifted second baseman Mike Morla.

Mike Morla was recently inducted into the coveted shrine of hardball heroes by the Baseball Writers Association. Morla was always a favorite of the beat writers — always quick with a quip and always willing to talk about the game — but that’s not why he got elected to the Hall of Fame. Morla played a good brand of baseball, too. He played in 2521 games, had 3285 hits, 422 home runs, 1519 RBIs and scored 1529 runs while batting .327 in his career.

Reminiscing about his life in baseball, Morla said it all began by hitting grand slam homers in the last of the ninth in his backyard and ended up in the Hall of Fame. “It was quite a trip. I can’t believe they pay us money to play a kid’s game. Thank goodness I was good at it. I only got a high school education and I had to cheat to get that. Who knows what I would have done without baseball. I was just a poor old country boy. For the longest time I even thought the last words of the national anthem were ‘play ball’.”